Top

Here is the information you selected for Library Assistants, Clerical in South Dakota.

Please choose which data categories you would like to see from the options below.
Work Activities
Tasks
Working Conditions
National Working Conditions
Typical Work Conditions
Work Values & Needs
Tools and Technologies
Typical Tools
Typical Technology

Work Activities

This section shows the most common work activities required by Library Assistants, Clerical in order of importance. Click on a link in the Work Activity column to view more detailed information.
Click a column title to sort.
Work Activity Work Activity Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Working with Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information. 91
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources. 80
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time. 79
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person. 78
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job. 78
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things. 76
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests. 72
Monitoring Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems. 70
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data. 70
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form. 61
Assisting and Caring for Others Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients. 58
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work. 57
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems. 56
Performing Administrative Activities Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork. 56
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events. 55
Thinking Creatively Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions. 52
Scheduling Work and Activities Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others. 49
Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others. 48
Coaching and Developing Others Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills. 47
Monitoring and Controlling Resources Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money. 46
Judging the Qualities of Objects, Services, or People Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people. 46
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used. 46
Communicating with People Outside the Organization Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail. 44
Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks. 44
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards. 43
Analyzing Data or Information Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts. 43
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling materials. 40
Training and Teaching Others Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others. 39
Developing and Building Teams Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members. 37
Developing Objectives and Strategies Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them. 35
Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity. 32
Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance. 32
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Materials Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects. 31
Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles. 28
Providing Consultation and Advice to Others Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics. 26
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles). 22
Graph Color: Reset Chart
Based on a national survey, the most important work activity for Library Assistants, Clerical is Working with Computers with a score of 91 out of 100. The second most important work activity is Getting Information with a score of 80 out of 100. The third most important work activity is Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships with a score of 79 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Tasks

This section shows the most common tasks required by Library Assistants, Clerical in order of importance. Click on a link in the Task column to view more detailed information.
Click a column title to sort.
Tasks Task Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Sort books, publications, and other items according to established procedure and return them to shelves, files, or other designated storage areas. Core 83
Open and close library during specified hours and secure library equipment, such as computers and audio-visual equipment. Core 83
Locate library materials for patrons, including books, periodicals, tape cassettes, Braille volumes, and pictures. Core 82
Enter and update patrons' records on computers. Core 82
Answer routine inquiries and refer patrons in need of professional assistance to librarians. Core 81
Manage reserve materials by placing items on reserve for library patrons, checking items in and out of library, and removing out-of-date items. Core 81
Lend, reserve, and collect books, periodicals, videotapes, and other materials at circulation desks and process materials for inter-library loans. Core 77
Instruct patrons on how to use reference sources, card catalogs, and automated information systems. Core 77
Inspect returned books for condition and due-date status and compute any applicable fines. Core 77
Maintain records of items received, stored, issued, and returned and file catalog cards according to system used. Core 76
Perform clerical activities, such as answering phones, sorting mail, filing, typing, word processing, and photocopying and mailing out material. Core 75
Register new patrons and issue borrower identification cards that permit patrons to borrow books and other materials. Core 75
Process new materials including books, audio-visual materials, and computer software. Core 73
Provide assistance to librarians in the maintenance of collections of books, periodicals, magazines, newspapers, and audio-visual and other materials. Core 71
Send out notices and accept fine payments for lost or overdue books. Core 71
Review records, such as microfilm and issue cards, to identify titles of overdue materials and delinquent borrowers. Core 71
Maintain library equipment, such as photocopiers, scanners, and computers, and instruct patrons in proper use of such equipment. Core 69
Schedule, supervise, and train clerical workers, volunteers, student assistants, and other library employees. Core 68
Repair books using mending tape, paste, and brushes or prepare books to be sent to a bindery for repair. Core 68
Take action to deal with disruptive or problem patrons. Core 67
Prepare, store, and retrieve classification and catalog information, lecture notes, or other information related to stored documents, using computers. Core 64
Select substitute titles when requested materials are unavailable, following criteria such as age, education, and interests. Core 61
Prepare library statistics reports. Core 60
Deliver and retrieve items to and from departments by hand or using push carts. Core 58
Assist in the preparation of book displays. Core 53
Classify and catalog items according to content and purpose. Supplemental 82
Operate small branch libraries, under the direction of off-site librarian supervisors. Supplemental 74
Plan or participate in library events and programs, such as story time with children. Supplemental 69
Operate and maintain audio-visual equipment. Supplemental 68
Perform accounting and bookkeeping activities, such as invoicing, maintaining financial records, budgeting, and handling cash. Supplemental 68
Place books in mailing containers, affix address labels, and secure containers with straps for mailing to blind library patrons. Supplemental 65
Design or maintain library web site and online catalogues. Supplemental 65
Acquire books, pamphlets, periodicals, audio-visual materials, and other library supplies by checking prices, figuring costs, and preparing appropriate order forms and facilitating the ordering process by providing such information to others. Supplemental 63
Graph Color: Reset Chart
Based on a national survey, the most important tasks for Library Assistants, Clerical is "sort books, publications, and other items according to established procedure and return them to shelves, files, or other designated storage areas" with a score of 83 out of 100. The second most important tasks is "open and close library during specified hours and secure library equipment, such as computers and audio-visual equipment" with a score of 83 out of 100. The third most important tasks is "locate library materials for patrons, including books, periodicals, tape cassettes, Braille volumes, and pictures" with a score of 82 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

National Working Conditions

Library Assistants, Clerical

Library assistants, clerical held about 88,000 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of library assistants, clerical were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals 62%
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private 13
Elementary and secondary schools; local 10
Other information services 10

Library technicians held about 93,100 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of library technicians were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals 50%
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private 16
Elementary and secondary schools; state, local, and private 13
Junior colleges; state, local, and private 3

Library technicians and assistants generally work indoors. They spend much of their time at public service desks or at computer terminals. They may spend time in the library stacks reshelving books, a task that may require bending or stretching to reach the shelves.

Work Schedules

Many library technicians and assistants work part time. Library technicians and assistants in school libraries work during school hours. Those in public or college libraries may work weekends, evenings, and some holidays. In special libraries, technicians and assistants typically work during normal business hours but may have to work evenings and weekends.


Typical Work Conditions

This section shows the most common work conditions required by Library Assistants, Clerical in order of importance.
Click a column title to sort.
Work Condition Work Condition Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Face-to-Face Discussions How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job? 96
Electronic Mail How often do you use electronic mail in this job? 94
Telephone How often do you have telephone conversations in this job? 90
Contact With Others How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it? 89
Indoors, Environmentally Controlled How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions? 86
Work With Work Group or Team How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job? 84
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job? 79
Structured versus Unstructured Work To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals? 75
Physical Proximity To what extent does this job require the worker to perform job tasks in close physical proximity to other people? 73
Frequency of Decision Making How frequently is the worker required to make decisions that affect other people, the financial resources, and/or the image and reputation of the organization? 73
Freedom to Make Decisions How much decision making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer? 73
Deal With External Customers How important is it to work with external customers or the public in this job? 71
Importance of Repeating Same Tasks How important is repeating the same physical activities (e.g., key entry) or mental activities (e.g., checking entries in a ledger) over and over, without stopping, to performing this job? 68
Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions How much does this job require making repetitive motions? 63
Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls How much does this job require using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls? 63
Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results What results do your decisions usually have on other people or the image or reputation or financial resources of your employer? 62
Letters and Memos How often does the job require written letters and memos? 60
Time Pressure How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines? 60
Coordinate or Lead Others How important is it to coordinate or lead others in accomplishing work activities in this job? 57
Deal With Unpleasant or Angry People How frequently does the worker have to deal with unpleasant, angry, or discourteous individuals as part of the job requirements? 54
Frequency of Conflict Situations How often are there conflict situations the employee has to face in this job? 53
Spend Time Sitting How much does this job require sitting? 53
Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable How often does this job require working exposed to sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable? 51
Public Speaking How often do you have to perform public speaking in this job? 45
Spend Time Standing How much does this job require standing? 45
Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body How much does this job require bending or twisting your body? 44
Responsibility for Outcomes and Results How responsible is the worker for work outcomes and results of other workers? 42
Responsible for Others' Health and Safety How much responsibility is there for the health and safety of others in this job? 41
Spend Time Walking and Running How much does this job require walking and running? 38
Level of Competition To what extent does this job require the worker to compete or to be aware of competitive pressures? 36
Exposed to Disease or Infections How often does this job require exposure to disease/infections? 34
Degree of Automation How automated is the job? 32
Spend Time Kneeling, Crouching, Stooping, or Crawling How much does this job require kneeling, crouching, stooping or crawling? 29
Extremely Bright or Inadequate Lighting How often does this job require working in extremely bright or inadequate lighting conditions? 25
Exposed to Contaminants How often does this job require working exposed to contaminants (such as pollutants, gases, dust or odors)? 22
Graph Color: Reset Chart
The most important physical and social factors that influence the nature of work for Library Assistants, Clerical is face-to-face discussions followed by electronic mail and telephone.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Work Values and Needs

This section shows the information on the current work values for your selected occupation.
Click a column title to sort.
Work Value Work Value Description Rank By Extent (Out of 100)
Relationships Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service. 67
Support Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical. 45
Achievement Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement. 28
Working Conditions Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions. 25
Graph Color: Reset Chart
Based on a national survey, the most important work value for Library Assistants, Clerical is Relationships with a score of 67 out of 100. The second most important work value is Support with a score of 45 out of 100. The third most important work value is Achievement with a score of 28 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Tools

This section shows common tools used by Library Assistants, Clerical.
Click a column title to sort.
Detailed Tool Tool Group
Barcode scanners Bar code reader equipment
Braile embossers Braille devices for the physically challenged
Bookmobiles Cargo trucks
Cash registers Cash registers
10-key calculators Desktop calculator
Desktop computers Desktop computers
Digital cameras Digital cameras
Film projectors Film projectors
Laminating machines Laminators
Laser facsimile machines Laser fax machine
Laser printers Laser printers
Magnifiers Magnifiers
Mail opening equipment Mail opening machines
Microfiche printers Microfiche or microfilm viewers
Microfiche readers Microfiche or microfilm viewers
Microfilm readers Microfiche or microfilm viewers
Microfilm printers Microfiche reader printers
Delivery vans Minivans or vans
Multi function printers Multi function printers
Multimedia projectors Multimedia projectors
Photocopying equipment Photocopiers
Handheld calculators Pocket calculator
Scanners Scanners
Multi-line telephone systems Special purpose telephones
Thermal book binders Thermal book binding machines
Typewriters Typewriters
Video teleconferencing systems Videoconferencing systems
Personal readers Voice synthesizers for the physically challenged
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Technology

This section shows common technology used by Library Assistants, Clerical.
Click a column title to sort.
Detailed Technology Technology Group
Database software Data base user interface and query software
Microsoft Access Data base user interface and query software
Recordkeeping software Data base user interface and query software
Microsoft Publisher Desktop publishing software
Adobe Systems Adobe Acrobat Document management software
Microsoft Outlook Electronic mail software
Adobe Systems Adobe Photoshop Graphics or photo imaging software
Video retrieval systems Information retrieval or search software
Web browser software Internet browser software
Automated circulation systems Library software
Cataloging software Library software
Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) databases Library software
Online Computer Library Center OCLC Library software
Online Computer Library Center OCLC databases Library software
ResourceMate Plus Library software
WorldCat Library software
C++ Object or component oriented development software
Microsoft Office Office suite software
Microsoft Windows Operating system software
Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation software
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet software
Microsoft Word Word processing software
Word processing software Word processing software
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.



[ Change Occupation ]