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Here is the information you selected for File Clerks in South Dakota.

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Work Activities
Tasks
Working Conditions
National Working Conditions
Typical Work Conditions
Work Values & Needs
Tools and Technologies
Typical Tools
Typical Technology

Work Activities

This section shows the most common work activities required by File Clerks in order of importance. Click on a link in the Work Activity column to view more detailed information.
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Work Activity Work Activity Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Working with Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information. 72
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work. 70
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources. 68
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person. 67
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time. 67
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data. 64
Performing Administrative Activities Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork. 64
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form. 61
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job. 58
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events. 55
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems. 53
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards. 53
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things. 51
Analyzing Data or Information Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts. 48
Monitoring Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems. 46
Assisting and Caring for Others Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients. 46
Communicating with People Outside the Organization Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail. 44
Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others. 43
Scheduling Work and Activities Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others. 41
Judging the Qualities of Objects, Services, or People Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people. 40
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Materials Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects. 39
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling materials. 39
Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity. 39
Thinking Creatively Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions. 38
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles). 37
Developing Objectives and Strategies Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them. 34
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests. 34
Developing and Building Teams Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members. 34
Training and Teaching Others Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others. 34
Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks. 33
Coaching and Developing Others Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills. 32
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used. 31
Monitoring and Controlling Resources Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money. 27
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or watercraft. 25
Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance. 25
Providing Consultation and Advice to Others Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics. 25
Selling or Influencing Others Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions. 22
Staffing Organizational Units Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization. 21
Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles. 19
Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used. 19
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Based on a national survey, the most important work activity for File Clerks is Working with Computers with a score of 72 out of 100. The second most important work activity is Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work with a score of 70 out of 100. The third most important work activity is Getting Information with a score of 68 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Tasks

This section shows the most common tasks required by File Clerks in order of importance. Click on a link in the Task column to view more detailed information.
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Tasks Task Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Scan or read incoming materials to determine how and where they should be classified or filed. Core 86
Input data, such as file numbers, new or updated information, or document information codes into computer systems to support document and information retrieval. Core 83
Perform general office activities, such as typing, answering telephones, operating office machines, processing mail, or securing confidential materials. Core 82
Sort or classify information according to guidelines, such as content, purpose, user criteria, or chronological, alphabetical, or numerical order. Core 78
Answer questions about records or files. Core 78
Keep records of materials filed or removed, using logbooks or computers and generate computerized reports. Core 77
Add new material to file records or create new records as necessary. Core 76
Gather materials to be filed from departments or employees. Core 76
Find, retrieve, and make copies of information from files in response to requests and deliver information to authorized users. Core 76
Track materials removed from files to ensure that borrowed files are returned. Core 74
Place materials into storage receptacles, such as file cabinets, boxes, bins, or drawers, according to classification and identification information. Core 73
Eliminate outdated or unnecessary materials, destroying them or transferring them to inactive storage, according to file maintenance guidelines or legal requirements. Core 69
Perform periodic inspections of materials or files to ensure correct placement, legibility, or proper condition. Core 68
Modify or improve filing systems or implement new filing systems. Core 61
Design forms related to filing systems. Core 60
Complete general financial activities, such as processing accounts payable, reviewing invoices, collecting cash payments, or issuing receipts. Supplemental 78
Operate mechanized files that rotate to bring needed records to a particular location. Supplemental 71
Assign and record or stamp identification numbers or codes to index materials for filing. Supplemental 64
Retrieve documents stored in microfilm or microfiche and place them in viewers for reading. Supplemental 58
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Based on a national survey, the most important tasks for File Clerks is "scan or read incoming materials to determine how and where they should be classified or filed" with a score of 86 out of 100. The second most important tasks is "input data, such as file numbers, new or updated information, or document information codes into computer systems to support document and information retrieval" with a score of 83 out of 100. The third most important tasks is "perform general office activities, such as typing, answering telephones, operating office machines, processing mail, or securing confidential materials" with a score of 82 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

National Working Conditions

File Clerks

Information clerks held about 1.3 million jobs in 2020. Employment in the detailed occupations that make up information clerks was distributed as follows:

Hotel, motel, and resort desk clerks 221,000
Interviewers, except eligibility and loan 180,200
Court, municipal, and license clerks 162,100
Information and record clerks, all other 159,900
Eligibility interviewers, government programs 145,400
Order clerks 133,900
Human resources assistants, except payroll and timekeeping 112,000
Reservation and transportation ticket agents and travel clerks 101,600
File clerks 99,700
Correspondence clerks 7,000

The largest employers of information clerks were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals 15%
Healthcare and social assistance 12
Federal government 8
Transportation and warehousing 7
Administrative and support services 5

Information clerks work in nearly every industry. Although most clerks work in offices, interviewers may travel to applicants' locations to meet with them.

The work of information clerks who provide customer service can be stressful, particularly when dealing with dissatisfied customers.

Reservation and transportation ticket agents at airports or shipping counters lift and maneuver heavy luggage or packages, which may weigh up to 100 pounds.

Injuries and Illnesses

Reservation and transportation ticket agents and travel clerks have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations. Lifting and maneuvering heavy luggage or packages may lead to sprains, strains, or overexertion. To avoid injuries, these workers must follow procedures, such as protocols for safe lifting.

Work Schedules

Most information clerks work full time. However, part-time work is common for hotel clerks and file clerks.

Clerks in lodging and transportation establishments that are open around the clock may work evenings, weekends, and holidays.


Typical Work Conditions

This section shows the most common work conditions required by File Clerks in order of importance.
Click a column title to sort.
Work Condition Work Condition Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Telephone How often do you have telephone conversations in this job? 100
Electronic Mail How often do you use electronic mail in this job? 90
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job? 90
Contact With Others How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it? 87
Work With Work Group or Team How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job? 83
Spend Time Sitting How much does this job require sitting? 81
Letters and Memos How often does the job require written letters and memos? 77
Responsibility for Outcomes and Results How responsible is the worker for work outcomes and results of other workers? 75
Face-to-Face Discussions How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job? 73
Coordinate or Lead Others How important is it to coordinate or lead others in accomplishing work activities in this job? 73
Deal With External Customers How important is it to work with external customers or the public in this job? 72
Structured versus Unstructured Work To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals? 69
Indoors, Environmentally Controlled How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions? 68
Importance of Repeating Same Tasks How important is repeating the same physical activities (e.g., key entry) or mental activities (e.g., checking entries in a ledger) over and over, without stopping, to performing this job? 67
Time Pressure How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines? 65
Deal With Unpleasant or Angry People How frequently does the worker have to deal with unpleasant, angry, or discourteous individuals as part of the job requirements? 56
Responsible for Others' Health and Safety How much responsibility is there for the health and safety of others in this job? 52
Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions How much does this job require making repetitive motions? 51
Freedom to Make Decisions How much decision making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer? 47
Physical Proximity To what extent does this job require the worker to perform job tasks in close physical proximity to other people? 47
Frequency of Conflict Situations How often are there conflict situations the employee has to face in this job? 45
Level of Competition To what extent does this job require the worker to compete or to be aware of competitive pressures? 44
Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results What results do your decisions usually have on other people or the image or reputation or financial resources of your employer? 43
Consequence of Error How serious would the result usually be if the worker made a mistake that was not readily correctable? 37
Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable How often does this job require working exposed to sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable? 33
Frequency of Decision Making How frequently is the worker required to make decisions that affect other people, the financial resources, and/or the image and reputation of the organization? 30
Exposed to Contaminants How often does this job require working exposed to contaminants (such as pollutants, gases, dust or odors)? 29
Spend Time Walking and Running How much does this job require walking and running? 29
Spend Time Standing How much does this job require standing? 27
Degree of Automation How automated is the job? 26
Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls How much does this job require using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls? 21
Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body How much does this job require bending or twisting your body? 21
Exposed to Disease or Infections How often does this job require exposure to disease/infections? 19
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The most important physical and social factors that influence the nature of work for File Clerks is telephone followed by electronic mail and importance of being exact or accurate.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Work Values and Needs

This section shows the information on the current work values for your selected occupation.
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Work Value Work Value Description Rank By Extent (Out of 100)
Support Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical. 56
Relationships Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service. 39
Independence Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy. 28
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Based on a national survey, the most important work value for File Clerks is Support with a score of 56 out of 100. The second most important work value is Relationships with a score of 39 out of 100. The third most important work value is Independence with a score of 28 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Tools

This section shows common tools used by File Clerks.
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Detailed Tool Tool Group
File cabinets Filing cabinets or accessories
Mechanized file systems Filing cabinets or accessories
Computer inkjet printers Inkjet printers
Stepladders Ladders
Laser facsimile machines Laser fax machine
Microfiche viewing equipment Microfiche or microfilm viewers
Microfilm viewing equipment Microfiche or microfilm viewers
Personal computers Personal computers
Copy machines Photocopiers
Document stamps Rubber stamping stamps
Document scanners Scanners
Multiline telephone systems Special purpose telephones
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Technology

This section shows common technology used by File Clerks.
Click a column title to sort.
Detailed Technology Technology Group
Intuit QuickBooks Accounting software
Microsoft SharePoint Cloud-based data access and sharing software
Data entry software Data base user interface and query software
Microsoft Access Data base user interface and query software
Adobe Systems Adobe Acrobat Document management software
Email software Electronic mail software
Microsoft Outlook Electronic mail software
Electronic filing software Filesystem software
Electronic health record EHR software Medical software
Microsoft Office Office suite software
Microsoft Windows Operating system software
Optical scanning software Optical character reader OCR or scanning software
Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation software
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet software
Microsoft Word Word processing software
Word processing software Word processing software
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.



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