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Here is the information you selected for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in South Dakota.

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Licensing Information
Knowledge Required
Abilities Required
Work Interests
Work Styles

Licensing Information

There is no data available for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in South Dakota.
There is no data available for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in South Dakota.

Typical Knowledge Categories

This section shows the most common knowledge categories required by Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in order of importance. Click on a link in the Knowledge Category column to view more detailed information.
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Knowledge Category Knowledge Category Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Administrative Knowledge of administrative and office procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and workplace terminology. 88
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar. 82
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming. 71
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction. 69
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources. 61
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications. 48
Communications and Media Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media. 44
Economics and Accounting Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking, and the analysis and reporting of financial data. 44
Personnel and Human Resources Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems. 43
Public Safety and Security Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions. 43
Telecommunications Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems. 37
Law and Government Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process. 36
Psychology Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders. 29
Medicine and Dentistry Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures. 28
Therapy and Counseling Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance. 24
Sales and Marketing Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems. 22
Sociology and Anthropology Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures, and their history and origins. 21
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Based on a national survey, the most important knowledge category for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive is Administrative with a score of 88 out of 100. The second most important knowledge category is English Language with a score of 82 out of 100. The third most important knowledge category is Computers and Electronics with a score of 71 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Work Abilities Required

This section shows the results of a national survey listing the most common work abilities required by Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in order of importance. Click on a link in the Work Ability column to view more detailed information.
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Work Ability Work Ability Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences. 75
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand. 75
Written Comprehension The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing. 75
Written Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand. 75
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer). 72
Speech Clarity The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you. 69
Speech Recognition The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person. 69
Information Ordering The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations). 66
Problem Sensitivity The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing that there is a problem. 53
Category Flexibility The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways. 50
Deductive Reasoning The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense. 50
Inductive Reasoning The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events). 50
Selective Attention The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted. 50
Time Sharing The ability to shift back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources). 47
Fluency of Ideas The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity). 38
Far Vision The ability to see details at a distance. 31
Perceptual Speed The ability to quickly and accurately compare similarities and differences among sets of letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. The things to be compared may be presented at the same time or one after the other. This ability also includes comparing a presented object with a remembered object. 31
Finger Dexterity The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects. 28
Memorization The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures. 28
Number Facility The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly. 28
Visualization The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged. 28
Wrist-Finger Speed The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists. 28
Arm-Hand Steadiness The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position. 25
Flexibility of Closure The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material. 25
Manual Dexterity The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects. 25
Mathematical Reasoning The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem. 25
Originality The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem. 25
Speed of Closure The ability to quickly make sense of, combine, and organize information into meaningful patterns. 25
Visual Color Discrimination The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness. 25
Auditory Attention The ability to focus on a single source of sound in the presence of other distracting sounds. 22
Control Precision The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions. 22
Hearing Sensitivity The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness. 22
Trunk Strength The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without "giving out" or fatiguing. 19
Dynamic Strength The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue. 3
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Based on a national survey, the most important work ability for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive is Oral Comprehension with a score of 75 out of 100. The second most important work ability is Oral Expression with a score of 75 out of 100. The third most important work ability is Written Comprehension with a score of 75 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Work Interests

This section shows the results of a national survey listing the most common work interests for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in order of importance.
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Work Interest Work Interest Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Conventional Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow. 100
Enterprising Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business. 67
Social Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others. 33
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Based on a national survey, the most important work interest for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive is Conventional with a score of 100 out of 100. The second most important work interest is Enterprising with a score of 67 out of 100. The third most important work interest is Social with a score of 33 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Work Styles

This section shows the most common work styles required by Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive in order of importance. Click on a link in the Work Style column to view more detailed information.
Click a column title to sort.
Work Style Work Style Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Attention to Detail Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks. 90
Integrity Job requires being honest and ethical. 88
Cooperation Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude. 86
Dependability Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations. 84
Concern for Others Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job. 81
Self-Control Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations. 78
Adaptability/Flexibility Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace. 76
Stress Tolerance Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high-stress situations. 75
Independence Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done. 74
Achievement/Effort Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks. 73
Initiative Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges. 72
Social Orientation Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job. 68
Persistence Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles. 68
Analytical Thinking Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems. 61
Innovation Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems. 59
Leadership Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction. 59
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Based on a national survey, the most important work style for Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive is Attention to Detail with a score of 90 out of 100. The second most important work style is Integrity with a score of 88 out of 100. The third most important work style is Cooperation with a score of 86 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.



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