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Here is the information you selected for Forest and Conservation Workers in South Dakota.

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Work Activities
Tasks
Working Conditions
National Working Conditions
Typical Work Conditions
Work Values & Needs
Tools and Technologies
Typical Tools
Typical Technology

Work Activities

This section shows the most common work activities required by Forest and Conservation Workers in order of importance. Click on a link in the Work Activity column to view more detailed information.
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Work Activity Work Activity Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests. 81
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling materials. 81
Communicating with People Outside the Organization Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail. 80
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work. 80
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems. 79
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person. 78
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or watercraft. 76
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events. 76
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources. 75
Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others. 75
Scheduling Work and Activities Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others. 75
Working with Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information. 75
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time. 74
Thinking Creatively Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions. 74
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job. 72
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things. 72
Developing Objectives and Strategies Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them. 68
Judging the Qualities of Objects, Services, or People Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people. 67
Monitoring Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems. 67
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards. 67
Training and Teaching Others Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others. 67
Analyzing Data or Information Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts. 66
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form. 66
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data. 66
Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks. 65
Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity. 64
Developing and Building Teams Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members. 62
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Materials Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects. 61
Monitoring and Controlling Resources Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money. 59
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used. 59
Performing Administrative Activities Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork. 57
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles. 57
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles). 53
Selling or Influencing Others Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions. 52
Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used. 50
Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance. 47
Assisting and Caring for Others Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients. 47
Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles. 46
Coaching and Developing Others Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills. 46
Staffing Organizational Units Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization. 44
Providing Consultation and Advice to Others Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics. 39
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Based on a national survey, the most important work activity for Forest and Conservation Workers is Performing for or Working Directly with the Public with a score of 81 out of 100. The second most important work activity is Performing General Physical Activities with a score of 81 out of 100. The third most important work activity is Communicating with People Outside the Organization with a score of 80 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Tasks

This section shows the most common tasks required by Forest and Conservation Workers in order of importance. Click on a link in the Task column to view more detailed information.
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Tasks Task Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Check equipment to ensure that it is operating properly. Core 74
Confer with other workers to discuss issues, such as safety, cutting heights, or work needs. Core 62
Gather, package, or deliver forest products to buyers. Supplemental 82
Sow or harvest cover crops, such as alfalfa. Supplemental 74
Spray or inject vegetation with insecticides to kill insects or to protect against disease or with herbicides to reduce competing vegetation. Supplemental 73
Maintain tallies of trees examined and counted during tree marking or measuring efforts. Supplemental 66
Identify diseased or undesirable trees and remove them, using power saws or hand saws. Supplemental 62
Drag cut trees from cutting areas and load trees onto trucks. Supplemental 61
Sort tree seedlings, discarding substandard seedlings, according to standard charts or verbal instructions. Supplemental 60
Operate skidders, bulldozers, or other prime movers to pull a variety of scarification or site preparation equipment over areas to be regenerated. Supplemental 59
Perform fire protection or suppression duties, such as constructing fire breaks or disposing of brush. Supplemental 58
Explain or enforce regulations regarding camping, vehicle use, fires, use of buildings, or sanitation. Supplemental 58
Examine and grade trees according to standard charts and staple color-coded grade tags to limbs. Supplemental 57
Erect signs or fences, using posthole diggers, shovels, or other hand tools. Supplemental 56
Fight forest fires or perform prescribed burning tasks under the direction of fire suppression officers or forestry technicians. Supplemental 56
Provide assistance to forest survey crews by clearing site-lines, holding measuring tools, or setting stakes. Supplemental 56
Select or cut trees according to markings or sizes, types, or grades. Supplemental 52
Maintain campsites or recreational areas, replenishing firewood or other supplies and cleaning kitchens or restrooms. Supplemental 44
Thin or space trees, using power thinning saws. Supplemental 43
Select tree seedlings, prepare the ground, or plant the trees in reforestation areas, using manual planting tools. Supplemental 42
Prune or shear tree tops or limbs to control growth, increase density, or improve shape. Supplemental 34
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Based on a national survey, the most important tasks for Forest and Conservation Workers is "check equipment to ensure that it is operating properly" with a score of 74 out of 100. The second most important tasks is "confer with other workers to discuss issues, such as safety, cutting heights, or work needs" with a score of 62 out of 100. The third most important tasks is "gather, package, or deliver forest products to buyers" with a score of 82 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

National Working Conditions

Forest and Conservation Workers

Forest and conservation workers held about 12,600 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of forest and conservation workers were as follows:

State government, excluding education and hospitals 29%
Forestry 25
Self-employed workers 17
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 10
Support activities for agriculture and forestry 5

Forest and conservation workers work mainly in the western and southeastern areas of the United States, where there are many national and state forests, and on private forests and parks.

Forest and conservation workers work outdoors, sometimes in remote locations and in all types of weather. Workers use proper safety measures and equipment, such as hardhats, protective eyewear, and safety clothing.

Most of these jobs are physically demanding. Forest and conservation workers may have to walk long distances through densely wooded areas and carry their equipment with them.

Injuries and Illnesses

Forest and conservation workers have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses of all occupations. The work may be especially dangerous for those whose primary duties involve fire suppression. To protect against injury, forest and conservation workers must wear special gear and follow prescribed safety procedures.

Work Schedules

Many forest and conservation workers are employed full time and work regular hours. Responding to an emergency may require workers to work additional hours and at any time of day.


Typical Work Conditions

This section shows the most common work conditions required by Forest and Conservation Workers in order of importance.
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Work Condition Work Condition Description Rank by Importance (Out of 100)
Electronic Mail How often do you use electronic mail in this job? 94
Face-to-Face Discussions How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job? 94
Telephone How often do you have telephone conversations in this job? 93
Contact With Others How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it? 93
In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment How often does this job require working in a closed vehicle or equipment (e.g., car)? 87
Freedom to Make Decisions How much decision making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer? 87
Deal With External Customers How important is it to work with external customers or the public in this job? 83
Outdoors, Exposed to Weather How often does this job require working outdoors, exposed to all weather conditions? 81
Work With Work Group or Team How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job? 80
Structured versus Unstructured Work To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals? 80
Indoors, Environmentally Controlled How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions? 79
Responsible for Others' Health and Safety How much responsibility is there for the health and safety of others in this job? 78
Responsibility for Outcomes and Results How responsible is the worker for work outcomes and results of other workers? 78
Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results What results do your decisions usually have on other people or the image or reputation or financial resources of your employer? 78
Coordinate or Lead Others How important is it to coordinate or lead others in accomplishing work activities in this job? 77
Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets How much does this job require wearing common protective or safety equipment such as safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets? 68
Frequency of Decision Making How frequently is the worker required to make decisions that affect other people, the financial resources, and/or the image and reputation of the organization? 67
Physical Proximity To what extent does this job require the worker to perform job tasks in close physical proximity to other people? 67
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job? 66
Exposed to Minor Burns, Cuts, Bites, or Stings How often does this job require exposure to minor burns, cuts, bites, or stings? 63
Time Pressure How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines? 62
Very Hot or Cold Temperatures How often does this job require working in very hot (above 90 F degrees) or very cold (below 32 F degrees) temperatures? 61
Letters and Memos How often does the job require written letters and memos? 58
Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable How often does this job require working exposed to sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable? 57
Level of Competition To what extent does this job require the worker to compete or to be aware of competitive pressures? 57
Frequency of Conflict Situations How often are there conflict situations the employee has to face in this job? 54
Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled How often does this job require working indoors in non-controlled environmental conditions (e.g., warehouse without heat)? 53
Spend Time Sitting How much does this job require sitting? 51
Importance of Repeating Same Tasks How important is repeating the same physical activities (e.g., key entry) or mental activities (e.g., checking entries in a ledger) over and over, without stopping, to performing this job? 51
Exposed to Contaminants How often does this job require working exposed to contaminants (such as pollutants, gases, dust or odors)? 49
Exposed to Hazardous Equipment How often does this job require exposure to hazardous equipment? 48
Spend Time Walking and Running How much does this job require walking and running? 48
Consequence of Error How serious would the result usually be if the worker made a mistake that was not readily correctable? 47
Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions How much does this job require making repetitive motions? 46
Deal With Unpleasant or Angry People How frequently does the worker have to deal with unpleasant, angry, or discourteous individuals as part of the job requirements? 44
Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls How much does this job require using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls? 44
Exposed to Hazardous Conditions How often does this job require exposure to hazardous conditions? 43
Spend Time Standing How much does this job require standing? 43
Public Speaking How often do you have to perform public speaking in this job? 42
In an Open Vehicle or Equipment How often does this job require working in an open vehicle or equipment (e.g., tractor)? 37
Extremely Bright or Inadequate Lighting How often does this job require working in extremely bright or inadequate lighting conditions? 34
Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body How much does this job require bending or twisting your body? 32
Spend Time Keeping or Regaining Balance How much does this job require keeping or regaining your balance? 30
Outdoors, Under Cover How often does this job require working outdoors, under cover (e.g., structure with roof but no walls)? 25
Exposed to High Places How often does this job require exposure to high places? 25
Pace Determined by Speed of Equipment How important is it to this job that the pace is determined by the speed of equipment or machinery? (This does not refer to keeping busy at all times on this job.) 21
Exposed to Whole Body Vibration How often does this job require exposure to whole body vibration (e.g., operate a jackhammer)? 19
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The most important physical and social factors that influence the nature of work for Forest and Conservation Workers is electronic mail followed by face-to-face discussions and telephone.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Work Values and Needs

This section shows the information on the current work values for your selected occupation.
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Work Value Work Value Description Rank By Extent (Out of 100)
Relationships Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service. 56
Independence Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy. 56
Achievement Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement. 50
Support Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical. 50
Working Conditions Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions. 31
Recognition Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status. 28
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Based on a national survey, the most important work value for Forest and Conservation Workers is Relationships with a score of 56 out of 100. The second most important work value is Independence with a score of 56 out of 100. The third most important work value is Achievement with a score of 50 out of 100.
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Tools

This section shows common tools used by Forest and Conservation Workers.
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Detailed Tool Tool Group
Protective ear muffs Acoustic ear muffs or defenders
Multipurpose tractors Agricultural tractors
Four wheel drive 4WD vehicles All terrain vehicles tracked or wheeled
Backhoes Backhoes
Claw hammers Claw hammer
Dibblers Dibblers
Electronic measuring devices Distance meters
Dump trucks Dump trucks
Fire plows Earthmoving shovels
Fire trucks Fire or rescue trucks
Epicormic knives Forestry saws
Pruning saws Forestry saws
Directional compasses Geological compasses
Geodetic ground global positioning system GPS receivers Global positioning system GPS receiver
Spray guns Hand sprayers
Hard hats Hard hats
Harvesting machines Harvesters
Portable ladders Ladders
Riding mowers Lawnmowers
Brush hogs Mowers
Personal computers Personal computers
Mattocks Picks
Planting drills Planters
Portable data collectors Portable data input terminals
Power drills Power drills
Chain saws Power saws
Motorboats Recreational motorboats
Fire trucks Rescue truck
Hand saws Saws
Phillips head screwdrivers Screwdrivers
Straight screwdrivers Screwdrivers
Loppers Secateurs or pruning shears
Spades Spades
Backpack sprayers Sprayers
Herbicide sprayers Sprayers
Measuring tapes Tape measures
Two way radios Two way radios
Water pumps Water pumps
Weedeaters Weeders
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Typical Technology

This section shows common technology used by Forest and Conservation Workers.
Click a column title to sort.
Detailed Technology Technology Group
Database software Data base user interface and query software
Microsoft Access Data base user interface and query software
IBM Lotus Notes Electronic mail software
Microsoft Outlook Electronic mail software
ESRI ArcGIS software Geographic information system
Geographic information system GIS software Geographic information system
ESRI ArcGIS software Map creation software
Geographic information system GIS software Map creation software
Leica Geosystems ERDAS IMAGINE Map creation software
Microsoft Office Office suite software
Microsoft Windows Operating system software
Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation software
Microsoft Project Project management software
IBM Lotus 1-2-3 Spreadsheet software
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet software
Microsoft Word Word processing software
Word processing software Word processing software
Source: This information is based on O*NET™ data. O*NET is a trademark registered to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.



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